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The Impact of Social Media Use on Social Skills

The Impact of Social Media Use on Social Skills

Engaging in various forms of social media has become a routine daily activity for most children and adolescents. According to a survey, 22% of teenagers log on to their favorite social media site more than 10 times a day and more than half of adolescents log on to a social media site more than once a day (Common Sense Media, 2009). 75% of teenagers own cell phones, and 25% use them for social media, 54% for texting and 24% for instant messaging (Hinduja & Patchin, 2007). Children, ages 8-18, spend over 7.5 hours a day, 7 days a week using media sites outside of school (Rideout, Foehr, & Roberst, 2010).

Social Media Use and Self-Esteem

Social Media Use and Self-Esteem

Social media, especially social networking sites like Facebook, have become increasingly popular and pervasive in recent years. Facebook has over a billion users around the world. Social networking sites allow users to create electronic profiles for themselves, provide details about their life and experiences, post pictures, maintain relationships, plan social events, meet new people, comment on others’ lives, express beliefs, preferences and emotions as well as fulfill belongingness needs (Ivcevic & Ambady, 2012). Social networking sites can also serve as a basis for social comparisons, self-evaluation or self-enhancement (Haferkamp & Kramer, 2011).

A Better Way to Develop New Friendships on Social Networks?

Woman using Facebook on her laptop computer

Consider the friends you have. Where or how did you meet them? You probably met a few through other friends you already had. Looking back at the original friendships, however, most of those likely originated at “places” you both frequented: school, workplace, church, swimming pool, gym, bars, etc. Right?